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New songs for a new ceremony

 

It just crossed my mind that it could be nice to listen to Vanilla Fudge playing *New York, New York* - REAL slow and REAL strange, of course.


I DON'T THINK SO. I'VE BEEN TALKING TO VINCE ABOUT A "NEW-OLD" SONG. BY D. ROSS & H.D.H.TEAM. I HOPE IT WILL BE ON THE NEXT ALBUM VINCE DOES. I LOVE THE "FUDGE" BEST "DOZER BOB"


Hey Eberhard,

It just crossed my mind that it could be nice to listen to Vanilla Fudge playing *New York, New York* - REAL slow and REAL strange, of course.<> Why not? New York is a strange place. (g). I recall Flo & Eddie did a cover of "No Business Like Show Business" on their classic LP, "Illegal, Immoral & Fattening" (great album!). There's some really great "show tunes" out there just waiting for somebody to rework. The Fudge's cover of "Windmills of Your Mind" was also a classic. There's also been plenty of great soul music since the Fudge were together I'd love to hear them rearrange. Stuff like "Show & Tell" by Al Wilson or "Dream Merchant" by New Birth. The problem today is that songwriting royalties make it almost unaffordable to record someone else's song...(sigh). Peace, Bill


Bill, what do you mean with song royalties are too expensive? Do they have to pay to record the song? Or do you mean if they record the song they don't receive badly needed royalties? I thought you can record whatever song and then the royalties for the writers go to the writers and for the performers go to the performers. Am I too naive again?


Hi Eberhard,

what do you mean with song royalties are too expensive? Do they have to pay to record the song? Or do you mean if they record the song they don't receive badly needed royalties? I thought you can record whatever song and then the royalties for the writers go to the writers and for the performers go to the performers. Am I too naive again?<> As I inderstand it, the problem in the United States is that several years ago the royalties payed to record or perform someone else's song were incresed dramaticaly. That's why few recording artist's now record or even perform in concert or on tv someone else's song. The royalties payed to songwriters deeply cuts into the "royalties pie" divided up among the songwriters, performers, record companies etc. The performer is usually the last to receive his share of the royalties. Every time a song is played on television or in concert the songwriter also collects royalties. The issue has become so bad in the United States that last year a songwriter actually sued the Girl Scouts of America for "singing" one of "his songs" at summer camp. The girl scouts weren't even performing. But the case was won because the Girl Scout camp was a commercial enterprise that individual Girl Scouts paid to camp in, and so the Girl Scout camp had to pay royalties for the girls singing the song around a campfire in the camp.

So your not naive - the United States has just become incredibly screwed up by it's own politicians, lawyers and money mad citizens. In many instances, rights to songs are no longer even owned by the songwriters but investors and businessmen with full time attorneys, control the rights to the songs and enforce their copyrights to absurd and even predatory lengths of litigation. Peace, Bill


Hi Eberhard,

No apology necessary. I share your frustration with the unhappy circumstances that have suppressed musical expression and creativity in the current era. History informs us that not all songwriters can perform or sing as well as they write. The reverse is true of performers. Eventually a more equitable arrangement must surface as the floodtide of recorded mediocrity continues to deflate record/cd/ticket sales on the retail level. Peace, Bill


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